Feeding the 5000 – Time to Eat

Searching His Word
Seeking His Heart

Last week, we saw that Jesus had mixed emotions. He was burdened with the news of John the Baptist’s death. At the same time, he rejoiced with the disciples who had returned from their successful ministry trips in Feeding the 5000 – Before the Feast.

Now they landed on shore and found a huge crowd ready to greet them. Jesus set his mixed emotions aside and had compassion for the people. As had been his pattern, He began healing the sick one by one.

I think about the temptation Jesus had in the wilderness. Remember when Satan wanted him to jump off the high pinnacle of the Temple and let the angels catch him? What a spectacular idea that was. It would dramatically show the people his great power.

But that was not the kind of Savior God had in mind. Instead, Jesus was to work in among the people, healing one by one, ministering to individuals, teaching small groups at a time. It’s unlikely that a crowd of 5000 could all hear him at once, no matter how strong a voice He had nor how much of an amphitheater the terrain provided. 

Eventually, the people would receive physical food, but first, He wanted to feed them the food of His words.

After a long day of healing and teaching, some of the disciples grew concerned about the people because they hadn’t eaten all day and they were in a rather remote place. They suggested that he—

“Send the crowds away so they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves.” But Jesus said, “That isn’t necessary—you feed them.” Matthew 14:15-16

John says that Jesus turned to Philip and asked,

“Where can we buy bread to feed all these people?” He was testing Philip, for he already knew what he was going to do. Philip replied, “Even if we worked for months, we wouldn’t have enough money to feed them!” John 6:5-7

About that time, Andrew spoke up.

“There’s a young boy here with five barley loaves and two fish. But what good is that with this huge crowd?” John 6:8-9

At least Andrew looked around for a solution, but he, too, was doubtful.

Isn’t that like us? Full of questions and doubts. We get so one-sided about what can or cannot be done in a certain situation. We don’t think outside the box. What are other possibilities? Are we going to limit God? Could He possibly have a miracle in the making for us? 

Next week, we’ll watch Jesus organize and go into action.

~ Joyce ~

 

 

 

Feeding the 5,000 – Before the Feast

Searching His Word
Seeking His Heart

We’ve looked at “points of view” coming from the four gospel writers on several happenings in the life of Jesus. When we looked at the feeding of the 5,000, you may remember I said I might want to revisit that exciting day in more detail. That will be our focus for the next few weeks.

What was happening before the great feast? I think it’s always important to get the setting, set the stage so to speak.

At some point in the time line, Jesus heard about John the Baptist’s terrible death. Recall the story. Herod caved when his wife, Herodias, (through her daughter) asked that the head of John the Baptist be brought to her on a platter .

As soon as Jesus heard the news, he left in a boat to a remote area to be alone. Matthew 14:13

What do you do when you have received tragic news? You may want to have the love and support of close friends or family, but, at some point, you may just want to be alone to collect your thoughts and deal with your emotions in private.

My hunch is that Jesus wanted to be alone with God and gather the inner strength he needed from his heavenly Father. Very possibly, Jesus thought about how he, too, would one day come under the cruelty of those in high places.

Think of those times in your life when the weight of tragedy or trying experiences brought you to a low ebb. Perhaps frustrations with a job or the cruelty of unkind words struck the very core of your spirit. Somehow, with God’s help, you managed to continue to function. It is in this kind of human condition, we find Jesus.

Later, when He looks up toward the shore, He sees his disciples who have returned from their ministry tour of the villages of Galilee where he said:

“Go and announce to them that the Kingdom of Heaven is near. Heal the sick, raise the dead, cure those with leprosy, and cast out demons.” Matthew 10:7-8

He shares in their excitement, glad to see their happy and hear their stories, then he tells them,

“Let’s go off by ourselves to a quiet place and rest awhile.” Luke 6:31

After more sharing, He looks at the shore where the crowds are gathering to meet him. I envision him sighing greatly and whispering, “Give me strength, Father.” Then we see his heart.

…as he stepped from the boat, he had compassion on them because they were like sheep without a shepherd. Mark 6:34

He welcomed them and taught them about the Kingdom of God, and he healed those who were sick. Luke 9:11

Jesus moved forward in the strength God gave him—an important lesson for us. For you see, that same power is available to us as we push out alone in out boats to receive healing and inner strength from our Lord. May it be so for us all this week.

~ Joyce ~

 

 

Peter – One Step Back

Searching His Word

Seeking His Heart

In last week’s blog Peter rose to the top of the list with his comment. (See “Peter – Time to Shine”) This week we see that he’s felt emboldened to overstep his authority and will end up taking a step back.

Jesus begins a new emphasis in His ministry—preparing the disciples for His coming suffering and death. It isn’t what they want to hear and they have a time dealing with it much less accepting it. They don’t want to travel down this road.

                   

Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, chief priest, and teachers of the law, and that he must be killed (yes, KILLED) and on the third day be raised to life. Matthew 16:21

Peter didn’t want anything to upset the glorious earthly plans he had for Jesus. So Peter, the one who made the great declaration of faith earlier, takes it upon himself to pull Jesus aside and rebuke Him. Yes, Peter rebukes Jesus!

“Never, Lord!” he said. “This shall never happen to you!”

Jesus has infinite patience, but Peter has overstepped his boundaries and this defiance must be quenched. Jesus turns to Peter and says,

“Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the things of God, but the things of men.” Matthew 16:23

Then Jesus turns to the other disciples and says those hard words.

“If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.” Matthew 16:24

What does this mean for us? We want to be mighty men and women in the kingdom work; we want to be bold like Peter, but like Peter we become weak. We overstep or we take a step backward.

                  

I think about those times when I’m in the sauna after water aerobics at the Y. Sometimes there’s a believer among the group who initiates a comment about the Bible or morality or life in general. Often I join right in or sometimes I feel compelled to say something profound, but by the time I have the boldness to say it, the conversation has turned another way. An opportunity lost.

I want to be a brave warrior for you, Lord, but I am weak. Help me to deny myself, my fears, and inabilities and take up the strength that you modeled for us on the cross and follow you.

~ Joyce ~

 

The Dinner Party Observers

Searching His Word   Seeking His Heart

Searching His Word
Seeking His Heart

Our scene was set last week with Jesus, Matthew, and his friends at a dinner.

While Jesus was having dinner at Matthew’s house, many tax collectors and “sinners” came and ate with him and his disciples. Matthew 9:10

Ah, so Jesus disciples came along too. Wouldn’t you love to know what they thought about this gathering? Did Jesus prepare them for what was about to take place? Did he say, “Now look boys, there’s likely to be a rough crowd there, but remember our goal here. We want to spread the good news to everybody.”

Or, did he just let it happen? I spring for this second option.  Read on:

When the Pharisees saw this, they asked his disciples, “Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and ‘sinners’?” Matthew 9:11

Were the Pharisees invited? No, they weren’t on the guest list, but often the dinning areas in large homes were rather open. Passers-by could easily see all who gathered. The disciples were likely on the outer edge of the group, probably not too comfortable with the main guests. In fact, they may have been asking the same question in their minds.

 In essence the Pharisees were saying, “These people are the scum of our community. Why taint your reputations with the likes of these law breakers? Don’t you realize these are Roman sympathizers?  Why would you give them the time of day, much less fraternize with them, even eat with them?”

Jesus knew exactly what was going on in the disciples’ minds as well as the question being mumbled by the Pharisees. Perhaps Jesus hesitated before answering the question, hoping his men would answer.  After all, the question was asked of the disciples, not Jesus. But we hear not one word from his followers.

Let me pause here to remind you that all three synoptic gospel writers (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) report Jesus healing many people by this time, so the disciples have seen His power. They’ve likely heard His discourses on the importance of loving God and loving people as well. So while they have heard the Word from the Lord and seen His power displayed, perhaps they have not had much practice in the doing.

Since the disciples did not answer the question, Jesus responded to the Pharisees.

“It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.” Luke 5:31

A lesson that needed to be heard by the Pharisees and the disciples.

Do we need this lesson as well? How easy it is to vegetate in the land of the familiar—my routines, my responsibilities, my joys, my kind of people. Meanwhile, there are people who are spiritually sick around us who need the great physician. Lord, give us eyes to see. Help us to invite them to your ultimate feast in heaven.

We considered the invited guests last week and the observers this week. Next week, let’s see how Matthew himself is feeling about this dinner party. 

~ Joyce ~

 

 

Who Are the Twelve?

Searching His Word   Seeking His Heart

Searching His Word
Seeking His Heart

Today, let’s key in on “the twelve.” In churcheeze, the 12  refers to Jesus’ twelve apostles. Anyone care to name them all? Get out the old children’s chorus books. Maybe you have a song for naming them. No? Well, Matthew will help us out.

These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (who is called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James, son of Zebedee and his brother JohnMatt. 10:2

Yes, these two sets of brothers are well known—all fishermen living on the north side of the Sea of Galilee. Probably Peter and James are named first because they are the  older brothers of each set. Okay, that’s four. What about the other eight? Notice how they are grouped in pairs.

Phillip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus and Thaddaeus; Simon the zealot and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him. Matt. 10;2-4

Some are  listed just by their name; others are identified as “tax collector,” “son of…,” “the zealot,” or “who betrayed him.” I guess Peter is glad not to be listed as “the one who denied him.” (Just a side thought.) Matthew gives this list before telling about them going out two by two to share the Good News just as Jesus had been doing. I’m wondering if this is the pairing list. If so, it looks like Thomas and Matthew are traveling buddies.

This may seem a bit boring, kind of like, “Okay, what’s the point?” Stay with me here, and I’ll show you how my mind works as I’m in process of researching the character of Matthew.

It is more than obvious that Matthew is known as the tax collector. Amazingly, the story of his conversion and calling is the only mention of Matthew, other than the listings of the apostles. Could it be that, even after Jesus called him as a disciple, he heard the other disciples whisper this title behind his back on occasion? Hmm.

Another disciple we never hear about is James, son of Alphaeus. Keep his name in your mind as we will look at a possible connection with him next week.

Mark 3:16-19, Luke 6:12-16, and Acts 1:13 also give a list of the apostles with only slight variations of order and names. (For instance, Thaddaeus appears to also be known as Judas, son of James.)

Luke’s account tells us what Jesus did before he called out these specific twelve from among the many disciples who had been following him.

Jesus went out to the mountainside to pray, and spent the night praying to God. When morning came, he called his disciples to him and chose twelve of them, whom he also designated apostles. Luke 6:12-13

As always, Jesus prayed before making important decisions—a model for us. He also prayed as a regular pattern—again, a model for us.

My questions, when thinking of these men who had been set apart by Jesus, are:

What were their lives like up to this point?

What were their personalities? What potential did Jesus see in each of them?

How will He use each of their gifts and life experiences to be his designated leaders?

We will explore these ideas in the next couple of weeks by keying in on Matthew. Join me for the adventure!

~ Joyce ~